A few months ago I cam across a fascinating study by Daniel Evans and Dr. Charles Thomas, two researchers at The Network Science Center at West Point. They set out to undertake one of the more ambitious studies of the business space in Africa, a network mapping study about who the key players in each market and how the influence or affect one another. Why? To quantify the entrepreneurial network in such a way that the analysis provides concrete policy recommendations.

The results tend to look something like this, where each node represents different key players or actors in the respective entrepreneurial spaces of each hub or country:

West Point Africa Research

The trip was several months long, taking them to various countries and innovation hubs all over the continent and the results are fascinating. A description from the authors themselves from their first paper “Who do you know?” Developing and Analyzing Entrepreneur Networks:

Our research goal is to quantify the entrepreneurial network in such a way that the analysis provides concrete policy recommendations. Our Center has experimented with several data collection methodologies and we have developed an innovative yet simple technique that allows us to develop quantifiable entrepreneur networks. Our innovation is not to develop each individual entrepreneur’s network but to understand the entire entrepreneurial network of the community in which the entrepreneur lives and operates. In order to develop this model, we have adapted a technique used in sociology to measure social capital called the Position Generator (Lin & Dumin,1986; Lin et al, 2001). This technique circumvents the massive effort of mapping an individual’s social network before locating the social resources in it. By approaching the entrepreneur’s network through the analysis of his connections to prominent structural positions in the community or society, researchers are able to construct measures that obtain information on the strength of ties and structural holes (Lin, 2001).

Dan Evans has been doign a fantastic job blogging his research over at the WestPoint blog but gave us permission to make his work available through our open data portal, Statfrica.  The first of three of their papers are now available for download here.  They are:

  • “Who do you know?”- Developing and Analyzing Entrepreneur Networks
  • Quantifying Entrepreneurial Networks: Data Collection in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Network Science Center Research Team’s Visit to Kampala, Uganda Daniel Evans and Dr. Charles Thomas

Each paper is supported by even more in-depth supplemental material at his blog.  For instiance here, here, here, here, and here…there’s way to much to link to so I encourage those of you who are data-driven to dow your own digging to find out some of of their fascinating discoveries. These papers are freely available here and elsewhere but please contact the authors for citations, references, or future publishing.

We’ll post follow up research of our own based on these papers in the coming months.

Download Network Analysis of Africa’s Tech Hubs and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems

For more details on these particular studies, contact: Network Science Center at West Point | http://www.netscience.usma.edu

Nairobi is home to the promised silicon savannah. Far from the 3-dimensional fly-throughs of the future technology park Konza City, we find a technology collective of a different kind side along North eastern Nairobi. Amidst the dusky haze over Kenya’s capital city a sunset makes way for twilight and nightfall.

Konza-Technology-City-3D-Render

The city’s newest thoroughfare, the Thika Superhighway, comes to life with streetlights and headlamps zooming to and from the outskirts and the burgeoning suburbs of Nairobi County. Beside the highway at the Safari Park Hotel and Casino, sundowners are mixed poolside. Investors, founders, writers and entrepreneurs exchange pleasantries after two chock-full days of pitches, launches and exchanges. DEMO Africa 2013 is over but the real work is only beginning.

Mutua-Matheka-Sunset-Nairobi-Cityscape

Unpacking the previous two days is not merely a matter of reading through the program and evaluating each company and their presence on-and-off stage.  Though it must be said that off-stage is where the bulk of the interactions took place. The DEMO Pit at the Jambo Conference Center was a constant corridor of backlit keyboards, keypads and keystrokes as the finalists took the benefit of time and close proximity to demonstrate their products. The ramifications of the two days this past October, now with the added benefit of the hype and media cycle slowing down, leave us with plenty to ponder.

Let’s look at 10 lessons we can take from DEMO Africa 2013 as we seek to understand trends and insights for the new year ahead.

1. The Changing Face of Tech Financing In Africa

The 40 finalists represented all corners of the continent. The benefit of reviewing the asks of each of the companies gives us context of comparing for any similarities or differences to their predecessors in 2012. Consequently, the categories and ranges of sums of investment proved similarities. Those finalists that chose to explicitly declare how much funding they had raised and what they were searching for ranged between $30,000 and $10,000,000.

When it came to the finalists, the majority were in the bootstrapping phase having involved seed capital by means of savings and personal investments. Interestingly, a fraction of them choosing to match this with grants and taking on venture funding to scale. In the cases where the lines between enterprise and social enterprise become less distinct we find some foundations and non-profit institutions taking to giving grants or in some cases investments for the pilot phase. OTGPlaya, RemoteCycle, Fairwaves, Duma among others being some examples of this trend.

This combination of grant funding and angel investing marks a key point in the African entrepreneur journey. Navigating the challenges of sources of capital and the philosophical questions around committing for a pilot/proof of concept to be non-profit in this discovery phase and transitioning to for-profit or sustainable enterprise soon after. Whether this raises some issues around transparency of intent along the startup’s life cycle remains to be seen. How much institutional investors get clarity on the source of original funding and any legal consequences for them is another question begging to be explored.

Questions around crowdfunding on the African subcontinent are also still pending in this discussion. This would be accelerated by mobile money’s advancement in key economies. Its maturity in Kenya and growth in Nigeria not to mention the mobile network operators aiming to turn the idea of Pan-African mobile money service into more than a gimmick. Is there is room for a Kickstarter of (and for?) Africa just yet or is our ambition better met out by a Kenyan/Nigerian/South African alternative of which there are several contenders?

2. Ushering in the Second Age of the African Technology Hub

Hubs, labs and accelerators across the continent have picked up over the last 3 years. From the iHub in Nairobi, ActivSpaces in Cameroon and Bantalabs among the first ones to well over 100 now all across the continent according to the famed Africa Hubs map by the team at Bongohive in Lusaka.

2014 will be a big test in the model for Nairobi specifically as the dynamics that play in the ecosystem of generating startups and cultivating entrepreneurs becomes clearer. DEMO was an opportunity to look to see any correlations between the finalists and the respective rise of technology hubs in a host of African cities. Though hard to draw a conclusive causal case for the technology hubs from the finalists, ties were evident with the use of space, connections and dissemination of information to the startups.

3. Art of the Start: Pan-African Ambition vs. World Ambition on an African Stage

Kwame Nkrumah said “Africa is one continent, one people, and one nation.” And yet the ambition for today’s African technology startups has been something questioned time and time again. Despite borders, language and geography amongst the list of complexities, there’s the assurances the internet and the mobile phone continue to make in a case for “digital PanAfricanism” and adding a currency to the late Ghanaian leader’s words.

This year’s DEMO Africa gathering confirmed that startups still took the challenge of demonstrating success at a local and micro-level in the cities, townships and capitals seriously. Phrases and notable diagrams typical of today’s lean startup a part of the founders’ vocabulary. Nevertheless there were those who took to the internet to bring the next customer – whether behind an iPad in Honolulu or by a chalet in the Swiss Alps. There was Zehoo getting into cloud computing by serving up a single search engine for one’s different cloud storage of e-mail, documents and attachments. GMobile’s look at the Kenyan Diaspora and their propensity for calling the continent connected with their remittances meant he’d uncovered a strong value proposition for connecting them and their loved ones at a fraction of the price of competing services.

2014′s African tech startup will need to look deep and wide, wrestling with questions of locality and perhaps hyperlocality with solving problems in cyberspace that could lead to a multitude of Africans signing up and signing in.

4. Social Media in Africa – less Snapchat, more Salesforce?

MXit has long been one of the continent’s leading stories for social networking. The South African juggernaut of mobile and social pioneering an age of instant-messaging and growing in emerging economies across the world. A fantastic story complete with the garage and long-haired jean-wearing hustle days and the corporate boardroom takeovers of today. But as the likes of Facebook, Whatsapp and more global social and messaging convergence takes place, the face of social media and social networking adapts in Africa.

Facebook recently surpassed MXit in South Africa as their largest social network with 9,4m active users to MXit’s 7,4m. That said for the social-oriented startups at DEMO Africa 2013 it was interesting to pick up on them choosing to bring social into specific workplace and personal scenarios rather than creating an all-encompassing African social network. Notable examples being Eventtus with events, Jooist and ChopUp with games and Famissima for mothers and families. Each one taking on a set target audience and sure not to compete with Facebook which is fast taking over the continent as the social network of choice with close to 50 million on the social network today.

The next iteration of social startups on the continent are set to pick and attempt to dominate verticals: gaming, family, jobs, small business and television (as witnessed by DEMO Africa alumni Djoss.tv) among others.

5. Gaming, gaming wherefore art thou, gaming?

The past few years have seen a steady rise in sexy African gaming startups. The winner of Pivot East 2012 was Ma3Racer – a minibus taxi racing game. One of the big winners who went on to wow at DEMO after winning in the inaugural event last year was Nigeria’s Maliyo Games. This year as well at Pivot East, we saw that Uganda’s Kola Studios was one of the winners with their Matatu card game. And yet, with all this momentum in African gaming there wasn’t a single gaming company featured in the line-up of the 40.

Gaming was a part or extension of several of this year’s finalists present but no out-and-out gaming startup present. It may have been a phase but perhaps the leisure market and content including how long it takes to scale is seeing more startups go for those untested and uncharted waters more.

5. No e-commerce, a tell-tale sign?   

E-commerce also didn’t feature this year. It’s been a busy year in the race to be the continent’s digital shop of choice. Whether you look at Jumia in West Africa, Rupu in East Africa and Kalahari from South Africa the amount of money being invested and growth rates for companies in e-commerce is enough to show big bets are being made. MIH Africa, Ringier and Rocket Internet taking each other to task as the race heats up. Looks like deep pockets count for a lot in this game too.

A large exit or significant liquidity event on the continent is still pending amidst much of the hype of the consumer technology potential. That’s not stopping some interesting news and activity to lead us to believe an African marketplace play will succeed – or a group of marketplace companies together. One Africa Media being an example of this could be set to be one of the ones to watch in 2014. For the DEMO companies, an exit via acqui-hire with Spark, MIH, Ringier, Rocket or other investors might not be a bad place to aim for.

The next year would be a good time to see the shift from the fight for the market to finding technology talent and see some M&A activity too.

6. The Diaspora: Talent, Audience and Finance

The African diaspora of 30.6m according to the Brookings Institute spread across the world sent over  $51.8bn to Africa  in 2010. The growth of “reaspora” through brain gain is another bonus. The affectionate term for members of the diaspora who are returning and getting into business, the marketplace and service in their home countries.

DEMO exhibited founders who could be categorised by this, having lived, worked and studied abroad and having returned to form ventures that made it to the finals. In other cases international citizens traversing the world ending up mixing global perspective and experience with their local counterparts’ insights to make for formidable teams. Eduze, Karibu Solar and Save and Buy among other examples of this.

The Diaspora also prove a strong potential audience with their affinity for technology and disposable income. They form part of ChamaSoft’s secondary audience attempting to bring transparency to savings clubs and groups – which often include members of the diaspora in their target market, Kenya.

7. Hardware made in Africa, For the World

One of the most interesting aspects from this year was in the hardware category. The mixing and matching of Africa’s challenges and needs with entrepreneurs who thought of hardware, software and variations of both made for interesting viewing.

Arguably the most eye-catching example of this was ViviFi. The Egyptian startup using their patented technology to turn any wall or surface into a touchscreen computer with the help of a WiFi connection. Their unique sticker technology means you could choose to switch off your lights by pressing a part of a brick wall or turning part of the wall into a screen to scroll through goods at a store. A myriad of applications in the real-world and with some of the continent’s limitations.

Fairwaves chose to democratise the telecommunications sector with low-cost base stations powered by open-source technology. By changing the audience from the large centralised telecoms companies to allowing smaller villages and municipalities to take their connectivity into their hands they open up a new business segment for themselves. Changing the price too meant innovating around minimal power consumption and building an architecture that sacrificed on sophistication but could connect much of the interior of the continent bringing in the first wave of GSM connectivity.

However, overcoming regulation for spectrum still presents a hurdle for them but it’s not an insurmountable one with the connections they made at the DEMO 2013. Also happens that this finalist had Russian founders, making technology for the continent and beyond.

8. Content is King – Delivery and Payment Remain the Empire

Africa’s next generation of content creators are born rising through the established channels – Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, WordPress and the web at large. However even for them to fully realise success there are a number of challenges around getting content in front of an audience that mean the value chain isn’t complete.

Content delivery is still a incomplete piece of the puzzle. Telecommunications companies are noticing the chance to rewrite the path they’re set on to derive value from content rather than ending up as defined in the “dumb pipe paradox.” While their own app stores, music marketplaces and mobile TV partnerships take place there’s still plenty of room for players to add value to a growing audience.

Eduze’s technology for example has seen them create hardware that incorporates a server, router and content delivery network in what they call CLOX or the cloud in a box. Giving a local connection to cached content they are aiming to bring an in-flight entertainment experience to taxis, locations and retail. With sponsored content as well as reimaginging broadcast and radio advertising for the digital age they hope to provide more accessible content and better value for brands to reach the connected audience.

Conclusion

Overall DEMO Africa 2013 proved through the startups present and by those absent that the African continent that 2014 is set to be a year of discovery, surprise and disruption. The best is yet to come and with the kind of ambition of the finalists and the 300 who were shortlisted, this won’t be the last we write of many of them.

Photo by Mutua Matheka.

Santa Clara Valley in California had a lot going for it up until the early 1980s. Having since been the centre for economic growth in California, the Valley was home to picturesque orchards of apricots, pears and other fruits and vegetables. Home to a steady economy hinged on agriculture and food production it’s no wonder the variety and business opportunities earned it the title “The Valley of Heart’s Delight.”

It was then that the introduction of the IBM Personal Computer and more importantly the semiconductor and microprocessor industries that defined the 3 decades that have followed. Consequently known today across the world as Silicon Valley, agri-business paved way for high-end technology, orchards making room for innovation labs and an age of software and hardware ushering us into a present day.

Between the 1970s and 1980s there were mentions of the term Silicon Valley and its imminent transformation but they remained murmurs as it wasn’t at full scale. Africa sits much on the same precipice today. The continent’s geography of hubs, labs and accelerators featuring to testify of the renaissance. MXit, Ushahidi, M-Pesa and a range of examples of innovation colouring dots on the new map of the continent. Regions and more specific countries making their own contribution to the collective redefinition of the brand known as Africa.

Mutua-Matheka-Great-Rift-Valley-Kenya

Coming closer to home is the majesty of the Great Rift Valley which thanks to its happens to form across more than half a dozen East and Central African countries. These said countries were recently represented among the 40 startups at DEMO Africa 2013 in Nairobi. The finalists share the vision of turning the continent into less of a market dependent on agriculture, natural resources and other expected forms of industry and enterprise. Instead by showcasing their businesses they took their chances on bringing software, hardware and a new discussion on Africa to light. The term Silicon Savannah could not hold more meaning and DEMO couldn’t signify a greater opportunity to solidify the credentials behind the term for the African continent.

2013 has been a great year for the nascent hardware production and fabrication sector in Africa. Far from the early days of young William Kamkwamba in rural Masitala. The Malawian inventor of a windmill sparking a decade of emerging under 18 innovators both literate and illiterate alike. This new generation is building and fabricating concepts years before they get access to a keyboard and software technology.

For DEMO Africa 2013, the convergence of hardware and software is a big sign of the times in Africa rewriting it’s present and future. From Ushahidi launching the BRCK to several DEMO participants each bringing longer term hardware ideas or prototypes to market, this year will be make or break in Africa and inevitably Nairobi in realising the truth behind the title of Africa’s Silicon Savannah.

D8A will be bringing opinion, analysis and insights from the two day conference from Nairobi, Kenya here on the blog as we unpack what went into the conference and what the outcomes were.

Image by Mutua Matheka.


Mark Kaigwa has spent the last 7 years helping global and African businesses, brands, and nonprofits use technology to connect with Africans online. He is a consultant, strategist, and speaker who likes to get hands-on solving problems and applying ideas that will change the future of the continent and emerging markets. Follow him on Twitter @MKaigwa.

Next week 40 of Africa’s finest startups will descend upon Nairobi, Kenya for the second annual DEMO Africa 2013. DEMO Africa has quickly risen to become the must-attend event for investors, entrepreneurs, tech media and others looking for Africa’s “next big thing”.

On Wednesday, October 23, we here at Appfrica and our partners at VC4Africa are hosting an invitation-only investor reception. If you’re an investor interested in early stage companies coming from emerging markets I encourage you to contact either our team or ben@vc4Africa.com to see if there are slots left. We couldn’t be more excited to be working with the V4Africa team who have truly pioneered a platform that I can only describe as ‘the AngelList’ of Africa!

What’s the purpose of the reception? Ben described it best on his blogpost earlier today:

Part of this year’s activities will include special networking events for investors. This is in the continued effort to foster a culture of investing in innovative early stage companies that have the potential to become Pan African if not global success stories. In addition to well known firms like Intel Capital, Jacana Partners, eVentures Africa, Fanisi Capital and The Blue Mirror Fund, there will be a growing number of ‘new breed’ angel investors mixing in the crowd. Take for example Jerome Kisting, the backer of Kenyan based m-Kazi, or Pule Taukobong, an investor in 7 companies including Wabona and Enzi. These individuals represent an emerging class of investor now coming up across the continent. They provide a critical link for entrepreneurs looking to break rank and they offer entrepreneurs much more than their cash, often sharing critical insights and a rolodex of valuable contacts entrepreneurs would struggle to gain access to otherwise.

Entrepreneurs from across the continent who are in attendance who might be interested in our own Apps4Africa Acceleration program, are encouraged to look for Appfrica staff onsite at DEMO where they’ll be scouting. In case you want know what goes on at DEMO, check out this mini-documentary which our team shot last year called Inside DEMO Africa 2012. You can find similar video at cheetahcode.com

We extend a special thanks to our friends at DEMO Africa, Lions@frica, the U.S. Department of State and AfriLabs for their support of another awesome event!

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of speaking at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida about the changing business landscape of Africa the opportunities that exist on the continent. I shared about the general market trends of the African continent as well as specific examples from the tech sector, from startups to companies worth over $100 million that are still Africa based and African owned. The slides I used can be downloaded from Statfrica.com or here on Slideshare.

For those looking for information on Africa’s internet penetration, visit the deck below…

Africa’s experiencing a bit of a boom in startup activity right now. What’s driving it? Who’s helping to grow the ecosystem? This graphic explores the topic.

Africa's Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Infographic available from Statfrica

White lines represent the monetary support organizations like Indigo Trust and Infodev are proving to the innovation hubs of the continent which in turn support entrepreneurs with non-monetary services represented by the gray lines. Mentoring, workshops, events, conferences, investor meetings etc. are the types of things these hubs are responsible for organizing. Meanwhile, Local governments have mostly been responsible for enable policy decisions. Can they become direct financiers of entrepreneurs and/or the network of hubs? The fact that this ecosystem has emerged mostly without their intervention certainly presents that opportunity.

For a more in-depth analysis on startup entrepreneurship as a driver of economic growth in Africa download our latest report New African Business.

Statfrica Africa Research Trends

A portal for learning, sharing and discovering more about Africa.

Over the years we’ve collected more data about Africa than we can hope to ever use as one company. However, we know from meeting many other companies, NGOs, schools, investors and others that there is a huge amount of demand for all things Africa. The problem most of these groups have is not that they can’t find information, but that things are changing so rapidly, they can’t find up-to-date information. Usually articles are three to five years old. Its also hard to find information on topics that is immediately applicable like information on contemporary African social entrepreneurs, consumer behavior, and research around trends that haven’t quite caught the attention of corporates global research firms.

With Statfrica we’re making of our incredible amounts of research on these subjects available to all, for free!

Open Courseware, Open Research, Open Data

Perhaps the biggest opportunity though, is to change how classrooms teach Africa to students. I recently spoke at an international business school where much of the knowledge being offered about Africa was from the 80s and 90s, when the most recent text books were published. There was little information about contemporary phenomena like the growing strength of ‘south-south’ trade (from developing nation to developing nation).

The other problem we noticed was that corporations, universities, bloggers, entrepreneurs etc. were spending their time collecting the same information over-and-over again for different purposes. This is an incredible waste of time and while there are options for hiring firms to do this kind of research for you, it can be unbelievably expensive — obviously not a solution for students, smaller non-profits, or young entrepreneurs.

Many Options

For professional analysts and universities, all of our material is available in a way that is modification friendly. We realized that it was rare to find files that can be completely remixed or modified so that they fit within a lesson. With Statfrica Pro, subscribers can download the raw files used to make each presentation in multiple formats (.pptx, .key, .pdf, .html, .ai, .psd). This gives you 100% control over what you use or don’t use in a classroom, boardroom, or conference presentation. There’s also a lot of supplemental material that isn’t available at the free rate.

Take an infographic like the one above and remix it completely!

Interested in a free or paid subscription? Check out pricing here.

By opening up our research repository, we hope to create a community that’s more aware of Africa, and an Africa that’s more aware of itself. In fact, we like to use the tagline “Africa’s Quantified Self”!

For updates specifically related to our research initiatives, please follow us @statfrica on Twitter or visit statfrica.com.

Proud to be Kenyan

Jon Gosier —  September 23, 2013 — Leave a comment

The following post was originally written by Appfrica’s own Ahmed Maawy. The thoughts and best wishes are with him and our other friends in Kenya in these trying times.

Most times being a Kenyan makes me proud. Proud of our capabilities, proud of our achievements as a nation, proud to be part of a people who understand that they hold the keys to their own success.

I write this after the crisis that has found us recently with the attacks at the Westgate Shopping Mall in Nairobi. Why do moments like these make me super proud?

Kenyans for Kenya

“The “Kenyans for Kenya” initiative is a fundraiser that was started in July 2011 by corporate leaders and the Red Cross in response to media reports of famine and deaths from starvation in Turkana District.” – Wikipedia

Back in 2011 the Turkana District faced a huge famine situation. Kenyans were requested to donate to help famine victims in Turkana, and in a joint demonstration of unity and solidarity for the people of Turkana, donate we did. And we saved lives.

Screen Shot 2013-09-23 at 4.37.44 AM

Westgate Rescue Efforts, Blood, and Monetary Donations

Following the terrible events at Westgate, it is so pleasing to see yet again how Kenyans united, stood together, laid a helping hand, donated blood, and donated money (in a similar fashion as Kenyans for Kenya) to again prove to the world how we are splendid people who can stand on our two feet and solve our own problems.

Kenyan Mall Attack Rescue

Amidst all the issues we face as a country, we stand united in times of need. #WeAreOne.

A Bright Future Ahead of Us

Over the past couple of months, I have been personally involved in setting up a framework for the next generation of technology awareness and capacity in Mombasa as well as the Kenyan Coast. In Mombasa in particular I was key in the formation of the Mombasa Tech Community. The just concluded NaiLab hackathon demonstrated that we were getting things right in Mombasa.

The events that have happened in Kenya (not only one, but twice) go to prove that we hold the keys to solving the problems we face.

Follow Ahmed on Twitter

The Fifth Estate

Jon Gosier —  September 21, 2013 — Leave a comment

The title of the upcoming WikiLeaks biopic THE FIFTH ESTATE invokes the words of French philosopher Montesquieu who left us the concept of the Three Estates of the Realm (Church, Citizens, and The Government). Essentially the three exist to check the power of the others. Edmund Burke argued the Press makes up a Fourth Estate (a check on the aforementioned three). Later William Dutton argued that a Fifth Estate are not just the users of transmedia but all those connected through the internet and who use it to take action. Great recent examples of this ‘Fifth Estate’ at work are WikiLeaks, but also those who opposed SOPA in the U.S., communities like Global Voices, and my former colleagues at Ushahidi and the greater Crisis Mapping community.

The Fifth Estate

In Africa these connections look very different than they do in North America and Europe. The first four estates are roughly the same: The Church, Citizens, The Government, and The Press. But its hard for me to see how those the connections relevant to developed countries, are always relevant to those in developing countries. The needs are different. What it means to accomplish significant change is very different.

So, I argue that Africa isn’t a place, but a space — a state of mind that exists in the diaspora, those who live there, and others connected beyond borders.

Africa is not a place, it's a space.

The above image was created by Kai Krause to represent the mind-boggling scale of the physical size of Africa. However, I like it because to me it represents how, even when removed and living in other parts of the world, Africans are still the stewards of Africa.

I personally do not see the distinction between people who are African-American, Afro-Caribbean, Kenyan, Uganda, whatever. There only those who take responsibility for participating in the development of the continent and those who don’t. Focusing on to narrowly on where you’re from or where you’re physically at misses the point and further excludes you from a broader community. This difference in ‘connection’ matters, especially when you look at the untapped wealth the African diaspora holds around the world.

Untapped Wealth of African Diaspora

So I like to think that the African diaspora, is the real Fifth Estate of Africa. They have the money, the political sway, the mobility, and personal security that allows them to truly affect change in Africa. They aren’t connected specifically through technology (though many are) but mostly through heritage and community. The question is whether or not the Diaspora will exercise this power or not.

Think of it like this. Africa has vast quantities of land, minerals, solar energy, wildlife and agriculture that has been commoditized to its own exclusion and detriment. The only thing left to be exploited is its own agency and human capital. Its no wonder then that ‘The Diaspora’ is now who development agencies are turning to as a resource to fund projects and programatic work. Same story but hopefully with a different ending.

You can view the slides below or download them here.

This presentation was given at the Kongossa Web Series 2013 in Montreal, Canada. thanks for inviting me!

On Tuesday August 6th, 2013 we were honored to host a pre-screening of our documentary THE CHEETAH CODE at the social impact/civic hack space the OpenGov Hub!

THE CHEETAH CODE is a web series and forthcoming documentary featuring interviews with the creative entrepreneurs and technologists who are changing the face of business in Africa. ‘Inside DEMO Africa’ is an excerpt of the film that was shown at the screening, it chronicles entrepreneurs from across the African continent as they arrive at DEMO Africa 2012 to pitch investors and network. You can watch this excerpt in its entirety on Vimeo.

Jon Gosier and Kaushal Jhalla

Jon Gosier (Founder of Appfrica & Director of THE CHEETAH CODE) with Kaushal Jhalla (World Bank Innovation Team)

Christina Crawley (OpenGov Hub)

Christina Crawley welcomes guests to the OpenGov Hub.

Reggie Showers (Urban Youth)

Reggie Showers of Urban Youth having a conversation.

Thomas Genton (U.S. Department of State)

Thomas Genton of the United States Department of State watching himself on screen.

Wayan Vota (Kurante)

Many thanks to Wayan Vota of Kurante who helped us get set up for the event.

Guests chatting before the screening.

Guests chatting before the screening.